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Suspended Ceilings Partitions Plastering Drylining Tel: 01 4929045 Fax: 01 4412764
Plastering Services

Reilly Ceilings and Drywall provide a full range of plastering both internal and external render.
Plaster is a building material used for coating walls and ceilings. Plaster starts as a dry powder similar to mortar or cement and like those materials it is mixed with water to form a paste which liberates heat and then hardens. Unlike mortar and cement, plaster remains quite soft after setting, and can be easily manipulated with metal tools or even sandpaper. These characteristics make plaster suitable for a finishing, rather than a load-bearing material.

The term plaster can refer to gypsum plaster (also known as plaster of Paris), lime plaster, or cement plaster.
 

Gypsum plaster/Plaster of Paris

Gypsum plaster, or Plaster of Paris, is employed by mixing water with calcium sulfate hemihydrate, nominally CaSO4·1/2H2O. This is produced by heating gypsum to about 300°F (150 °C).[1]

2 CaSO4·2H2O → 2 CaSO4·0.5H2O + 3 H2O (released as steam).

When the dry plaster powder is mixed with water, it re-forms into gypsum. If plaster or gypsum is heated above 200°C, anhydrite is formed, which will also re-form as gypsum if mixed with water.[2]

A large gypsum deposit at Montmartre in Paris led gypsum plaster to be commonly known as "plaster of Paris"

Lime plaster

To make lime plaster, limestone (calcium carbonate) is heated to produce quicklime (calcium oxide). Water is then added to produce slaked lime (calcium hydroxide), which is sold as a wet putty or a white powder. Additional water is added to form a paste prior to use. The paste may be stored in air-tight containers. Once exposed to the atmosphere, the calcium hydroxide turns back into calcium carbonate, causing the plaster to set.

Lime plaster was a common building material for wall surfaces in a process known as lath and plaster, whereby a series of wooden strips on a studwork frame was covered with a semi-dry plaster that hardened into a surface. The plaster used in most lath and plaster construction was mainly lime plaster, with a cure time of about a month. To stabilize the lime plaster during curing, small amounts of plaster of Paris were incorporated into the mix. Because plaster of Paris sets quickly, "retardants" were used to slow setting time enough to allow workers to mix large working quantities of lime putty plaster. A modern form of this method uses expanded metal mesh over wood or metal structures, which allows a great freedom of design as it is adaptable to both simple and compound curves. Today this building method has been partly replaced with drywall, also composed mostly of gypsum plaster. In both these methods a primary advantage of the material is that it is resistant to a fire within a room and so can assist in reducing or eliminating structural damage or destruction provided the fire is promptly extinguished.

Lime plaster is used for true frescoes. Pigments, diluted in water, are applied to the still wet plaster.

Cement plaster

Cement plaster is a mixture of suitable plaster, sand, portland cement and water which is normally applied to masonry interiors and exteriors to achieve a smooth surface. Interior surfaces sometimes receive a final layer of gypsum plaster. Walls constructed with stock bricks are normally plastered while face brick walls are not plastered. Various cement-based plasters are also used as proprietary spray fireproofing products. These usually use vermiculite as lightweight aggregate. Heavy versions of such plasters are also in use for exterior fireproofing, to protect LPG vessels, pipe bridges and vessel skirts.



 




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